Welcome to Julian Kuiters Saturday, July 21 2018 @ 06:07 PM AEST

How to hide a property from a datasource when binding in ASP.Net design view

  • Contributed by:
.NET Programming

Creating your own custom classes for business objects and object datasources is a great way to provide and object model for databases.

But some classes might contain properties that you don't expect to show to end users when they are bound to a DataGrid, FormView or other databound control.

Luckily there is an attribute that you can attach to properties that you want automatically hidden from databound controls:

[Browsable(false)]

To hide a property from databinding simply place the Browsable(false) attribute immediately before your property declaration

Example:

[Browsable(false)]
 public int MyProperty {
    get {
       // Insert code here. 
       return 0;
    }
    set {
       // Insert code here.
    }
 }

ASP.Net - Server operation is not available in this context - Using Server.MapPath in Global.asax

  • Contributed by:
.NET Programming

If you try to use the Server.MapPath() function in your global.asax file for ASP.Net you are likely to encounter this error:

Server operation is not available in this context

To use Server.MapPath() in global.asax instead use:

System.Web.Hosting.HostingEnvironment.MapPath()

More details about System.Web.Hosting.HostingEnvironment.MapPath() are available on MSDN

ASP.Net Tools to Test High CPU Load, High Memory and High Disk Usage

  • Contributed by:
.NET Programming

Often when testing the performance of a ASP.Net website you need to see how the site will perform under extreme conditions. This is easy to do in a virtual environment where you can reduce the number of CPUs or available RAM.

But how do you test this on a physical box?

Vijayshinva Karnure has written a short list of tools that you can use to stress out the CPU, Memory and Disk outside of your ASP.Net application so you can look for memory / timeout / response problems

Check out the list here http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vijaysk/archive/2012/10/27/tools-to-simulate-cpu-memory-disk-load.aspx

A number of these tools come from the Windows SysInternals team who are all about performance

Keeping Exception.StackTrace Intact when Rethrowing an Exception

  • Contributed by:
.NET Programming

Nick Weinholt (.Net Performance guru and MVP) has an article on the correct method for rethrowing an exception in C# so that the Exception.StackTrace actually points to the root problem.

In C# the correct method for rethowing an exception is using throw; without any arguments within the catch block:

try {
// code
}
catch (Exception ex) {
throw; // Rethrow exception without resetting StackTrace
}

In VB.Net the method is the same:

Try
' code

Catch ex As Exception
Throw ' Rethrow exception without resetting StackTrace

End Try

Using this method the stack trace will go all the way down to the original exception, and not just to your catch block.